A DUSTIN WISSMILLER PHOTOGRAPHY project.

4.7.11 “Workin’ It”

"Workin' It"As a writer, I used to spend a lot of my time behind a computer. As a photographer, I spend a lot of my time behind a camera, but equally, if not more time still behind a computer thanks to technology. There’s a level of commitment to achieving your goals and a level of sacrifice. I miss dinners. I go to bed way later than I should. I give up a lot to get done the things I need to do.

I often get challenged by people, both in my field, and not, that say “You don’t create a photograph. It’s already in front of you. It already exists. You’re just pointing it out. Photoshopping is cheating. Digital is fake. Film is real. You have to achieve this to be considered a ‘pro’ or you need to sell this much before you actually consider yourself a successful. Bla. Bla Bla.”

Do I have rough days? Yes. Have I made millions? No. Have I shot the cover of Vogue? Not yet. So what have I achieved? I’ve seen people’s jaws drop at some of my photos, asking how I managed to capture that? I’ve had parents stand in front of me and cry tears of joy when they see a photo of their child, then hug me and tell me I managed to give them a memory that they will have forever. I’ve stood on a stage in front of tens of thousands of people and shoot a rock and roll concert and have people come up to me after and say, “How can I get your job?” I’ve taken a photo of something and thought it was the worst picture I ever shot, then give myself a migraine trying to figure out why everyone I know is telling me it’s the most amazing thing they’ve ever seen. Those reactions are what keep me coming back for more. I thrive off that energy!

At the end of the day why do I do this? Because I love it. Of course, the perks are magnificent. The people I get to work with are amazing. And as I sit here looking at this screen, adding a bit of sparkle to these beautiful eyes form this model I just shot I realize that the worst part of my day would most likely be the best part of someone else’s. I never take this for granted. This is what I do, because I love it. I hope you like it.

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One response

  1. Kathleen

    It’s not about the shot but the eye behind the lens. You see, you shoot and then you share.
    You help us see the things that are right in front of us, yet we are blind to it; you bring life to the simplest things in life; and you keep us in anticipation each day until we can “see” again through your lens what is right there in front of us.
    Thank you for bringing true sight to our blind eyes

    April 8, 2011 at 4:38 am